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Inequality in Financial Inclusion, Gender Gaps, and Income Inequality

From a new IMF working paper:

“We investigate the link between gender inequality in financial inclusion and income inequality, with three contributions to the recent literature. First, using a micro-dataset covering 146,000 individuals in over 140 countries, we construct novel, synthetic indices of the intensity of financial inclusion at the individual and country level. Second, we derive the distribution of individual financial access “scores” across countries to document a “Kuznets”-curve in financial inclusion. Third, cross-country regressions confirm that our measure of inequality in financial access is significantly related to income inequality, above and beyond other factors previously highlighted in the literature.”

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From a new IMF working paper:

“We investigate the link between gender inequality in financial inclusion and income inequality, with three contributions to the recent literature. First, using a micro-dataset covering 146,000 individuals in over 140 countries, we construct novel, synthetic indices of the intensity of financial inclusion at the individual and country level. Second, we derive the distribution of individual financial access “scores” across countries to document a “Kuznets”-curve in financial inclusion.

Read the full article…

Posted by at 10:32 PM

Labels: Unemployment

Hollowing Out: The Channels of Income Polarization in the United States

From a new IMF working paper:

“Data show that middle-income households have continued to move down, and less so up, the income distribution in the United States since the 1970s—a phenomenon that is often referred to as the polarization or “hollowing out” of the income distribution. While the level of income polarization is generally lower in the richer states (defined as those with higher median household income levels), there have been wide variations in income polarization over time and across states. We develop two indices to measure income polarization, including a novel hollowing-out index. We also examine the proximate causes of income polarization, using an econometric analysis at both state and household levels. The results suggest that technology, measured by job routinization, and international trade, measured by job offshoring, can explain more than half of the rise in income polarization, with broadly equal contributions. Household characteristics, particularly better education, have had important countervailing effects on income polarization. Policies should continue promoting technological progress and international trade, but also recognize that these positive forces have important side-effects on the income distribution and household welfare that need to be understood and mitigated.”

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From a new IMF working paper:

“Data show that middle-income households have continued to move down, and less so up, the income distribution in the United States since the 1970s—a phenomenon that is often referred to as the polarization or “hollowing out” of the income distribution. While the level of income polarization is generally lower in the richer states (defined as those with higher median household income levels), there have been wide variations in income polarization over time and across states.

Read the full article…

Posted by at 11:04 AM

Labels: Unemployment

Dani Rodrik Takes A Crack at Neoliberalism

Dani Rodrik says:

“That neoliberalism is a slippery, shifting concept, with no explicit lobby of defenders, does not mean that it is irrelevant or unreal. Who can deny that the world has experienced a decisive shift toward markets from the 1980s on? Or that center-left politicians—Democrats in the United States, Socialists and Social Democrats in Europe—enthusiastically adopted some of the central creeds of Thatcherism and Reaganism, such as deregulation, privatization, financial liberalization, and individual enterprise? Much of our contemporary policy discussion remains infused with norms and principles supposedly grounded in homo economicus.

But the looseness of the term neoliberalism also means that criticism of it often misses the mark. There is nothing wrong with markets, private entrepreneurship, or incentives—when deployed appropriately. Their creative use lies behind the most significant economic achievements of our time. As we heap scorn on neoliberalism, we risk throwing out some of neoliberalism’s useful ideas.

The real trouble is that mainstream economics shades too easily into ideology, constraining the choices that we appear to have and providing cookie-cutter solutions. A proper understanding of the economics that lies behind neoliberalism would allow us to identify—and to reject—ideology when it masquerades as economic science. Most importantly it would help us develop the institutional imagination we badly need to redesign capitalism for the twenty-first century.”

Here’s the rest of the article.

Dani_Rodrik

 

Dani Rodrik says:

“That neoliberalism is a slippery, shifting concept, with no explicit lobby of defenders, does not mean that it is irrelevant or unreal. Who can deny that the world has experienced a decisive shift toward markets from the 1980s on? Or that center-left politicians—Democrats in the United States, Socialists and Social Democrats in Europe—enthusiastically adopted some of the central creeds of Thatcherism and Reaganism, such as deregulation, privatization, financial liberalization, and individual enterprise?

Read the full article…

Posted by at 10:28 AM

Labels: Macro Demystified, Unemployment

Housing View – November 10, 2017

On cross-country:

  • Why I won’t buy a house in any major city – and neither should you – World Economic Forum
  • Migration and Its Impact on Cities – World Economic Forum
  • Why there? Developers’ rationale for building social housing in the urban periphery in Latin America – Cities
  • Prime Global Cities Index – Q3 2017 – Knight Frank
  • Homes and Mortgages 2017 – Housing Costs and Prices – ING
  • Public expenditure on housing: the shift from capital spend to housing allowances. A European trend? – National Housing Federation
  • Demographic structure and housing prices: East Asia and Europe – Ideas
  • Bloomberg Global City Housing Affordability Index – Bloomberg

 

On the US:

 

On other countries:

  • [Bulgaria] A Roof Over Our Heads: Ensuring Adequate Housing for All Bulgarians – World Bank
  • [Finland] Why housing policy in Finland is a success story – Housing Europe
  • [India] Time to rethink public housing? – The Hindu
  • [New Zealand] New Zealand to ban foreign home buyers – Global Property Guide
  • [Norway] Housing Crash Dodged in Norway, But Intervention Door Stays Open – Bloomberg
  • [United Kingdom] London’s bubbly housing market goes flat – Economist
  • [United Kingdom] FT Money Show: Property prices, self build and pension transfers – Financial Times
  • [United Kingdom] How to solve the UK housing crisis – Financial Times
  • [United Kingdom] Housing Market Discount Rates: Evidence from Property Taxes – London School of Economics

 

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Photo by Aliis Sinisalu

On cross-country:

  • Why I won’t buy a house in any major city – and neither should you – World Economic Forum
  • Migration and Its Impact on Cities – World Economic Forum
  • Why there? Developers’ rationale for building social housing in the urban periphery in Latin America – Cities
  • Prime Global Cities Index – Q3 2017 – Knight Frank
  • Homes and Mortgages 2017 –

Read the full article…

Posted by at 5:00 AM

Labels: Housing

Productivity and Pay: Is the Link Broken?

Interesting presentation by Stansbury and Summers.

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Interesting presentation by Stansbury and Summers.

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Read the full article…

Posted by at 3:40 PM

Labels: Unemployment

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