Global Housing Watch

Showing posts with label Global Housing Watch.   Show all posts

Housing View – October 15, 2021

On cross-country:

  • Euro Area Housing Markets: Trends, Challenges & Policy Responses – European Commission
  • Do Foreign Buyer Taxes Affect House Prices? – SSRN


On the US:   

  • 10th Annual Housing Conference – American Enterprise Institute
  • Why the U.S. Housing Boom Isn’t a Bubble – Wharton
  • Borrower Expectations and Mortgage Performance: Evidence from the COVID-19 Pandemic – FHFA
  • This Year, Half as Many Metro Areas Are Affordable to Low-Income Homebuyers as Last Year – Harvard Joint Center for Housing Studies
  • Maxine Waters ready to battle over potential cuts to housing aid. Waters, who proposed the funding as chair of the House Financial Services Committee, said in an interview that “I’m going to fight as hard as I can to keep as much housing as I can in the reconciliation bill.” – Politco
  • Millennials Team Up to Fulfill the Dream of Homeownership. Burdened by debt and facing soaring home prices, first-time home buyers are pooling their finances with partners, friends or roommates – Wall Street Journal
  • Is There a Relationship Between Regional Unemployment Rates and Older Adult Housing Stability? – Harvard Joint Center for Housing Studies


On other countries:  

  • [Australia] RBA Says Risks Remain for Excessive Borrowing, House Prices – Bloomberg
  • [Australia] RBA Sees Financial Stability Risks From Record-Low Rates, Housing Boom – Wall Street Journal 
  • China’s Harbin lends hand to property firms; Morgan Stanley upgrades sector view – Reuters
  • [United Kingdom] Return of the renters: price hikes, bidding wars and bribes. As cities relax pandemic restrictions and workers move back, competition for rented property is fierce – FT  
  • [United Kingdom] Boris Johnson’s Housing Headaches Aren’t Over Yet. His Conservative government has signaled it won’t be obsessed with building homes. That’s fine, but Britain still needs more affordable housing. – Bloomberg
  • [United Kingdom] Michael Gove urged to address loss of half a million social homes in England. Campaigners challenge new housing secretary to help more than 1m families on waiting list – FT

Photo by Toa Heftiba

On cross-country:

  • Euro Area Housing Markets: Trends, Challenges & Policy Responses – European Commission
  • Do Foreign Buyer Taxes Affect House Prices? – SSRN

On the US:   

  • 10th Annual Housing Conference – American Enterprise Institute
  • Why the U.S. Housing Boom Isn’t a Bubble – Wharton
  • Borrower Expectations and Mortgage Performance: Evidence from the COVID-19 Pandemic – FHFA
  • This Year,

Read the full article…

Posted by at 5:00 AM

Labels: Global Housing Watch

Why the U.S. Housing Boom Isn’t a Bubble

Wharton’s Benjamin Keys explains why the red-hot U.S. real estate market isn’t a bubble that’s ready to burst. Home prices are likely to stay high for years to come:

“In Philadelphia, the median home price has risen 48% in the last decade. In Atlanta, the median sale price of a metro home hit an all-time high in June of $372,500. Not to be outdone by big cities, Boise, Idaho, recently ranked as the nation’s most overvalued market, where homes are selling for nearly 81% more than they should.

While the red-hot real estate market is finally showing signs of cooling, its meteoric rise has many Americans wondering if housing prices are a bubble that is about to burst, much like the collapse that triggered the Great Recession.

Wharton real estate and finance professor Benjamin Keys says that’s not the case.

“I come down very strongly against that view. I don’t think that it’s likely that we’re going to see a bubble burst in the way that we saw in 2008, 2009, and 2010,” he said during an interview with Wharton Business Daily on SiriusXM. (Listen to the podcast above.)

Although the frenzied buying and inflated prices are reminiscent of the run-up to the recession, Keys said there are several factors that make the current market different. First, loan standards that were loosened during the bubble are much tighter now, with stringent requirements for good credit, complete documentation, and a sizeable down payment. In contrast, the pre-recession years were pocked with subprime mortgages, low teaser interest rates that ballooned, weak underwriting, negatively amortized construction, and other questionable practices.

Second, the boom of the early 2000s was also driven by a surge in home construction that led to abundant supply. But there’s been a building shortage over the last 10 years, especially in cities with high demand. The result is a supply-demand mismatch that can’t be resolved quickly or easily.

“I think there was a bit of a hangover coming out of that 2000 boom and bust, and we’re underbuilt in a lot of cities where there’s demand for jobs, where there’s demand for housing,” Keys said.”

Continue reading here.

Wharton’s Benjamin Keys explains why the red-hot U.S. real estate market isn’t a bubble that’s ready to burst. Home prices are likely to stay high for years to come:

“In Philadelphia, the median home price has risen 48% in the last decade. In Atlanta, the median sale price of a metro home hit an all-time high in June of $372,500. Not to be outdone by big cities, Boise, Idaho, recently ranked as the nation’s most overvalued market,

Read the full article…

Posted by at 10:03 AM

Labels: Global Housing Watch

Do Foreign Buyer Taxes Affect House Prices?

From a new paper by Jonathan S. Hartley, Li Ma, Susan Wachter and Albert Alex Zevelev:

“This paper studies the impact of foreign buyer taxes on house prices using recent law changes in Canada, Australia, and New Zealand. Counterfactual house prices are estimated for each treated location combining prediction techniques from machine learning with inference methods from the Synthetic Control Method literature. In general, foreign buyer taxes have negative, large, and persistent effects on house price growth. We find bigger effects in locations with bigger taxes and with higher immigrant shares. Alternative outcome variables, including population growth, GDP growth, and unemployment rates were either unaffected or slightly affected in ways that do not confound our results.”

From a new paper by Jonathan S. Hartley, Li Ma, Susan Wachter and Albert Alex Zevelev:

“This paper studies the impact of foreign buyer taxes on house prices using recent law changes in Canada, Australia, and New Zealand. Counterfactual house prices are estimated for each treated location combining prediction techniques from machine learning with inference methods from the Synthetic Control Method literature. In general, foreign buyer taxes have negative, large, and persistent effects on house price growth.

Read the full article…

Posted by at 8:19 PM

Labels: Global Housing Watch

House Prices and Consumer Price Inflation

From new work by IMF Colleagues (Nina Biljanovska, Chenxu Fu, and Deniz Igan):

“Contrary to the expectation that house prices would decline during recessions (Igan and others 2011; Duca, Muellbauer, and Murphy, forthcoming), real house prices rose by 5.3 percent, on average, globally in 2020 as the pandemic-induced economic downturn took hold. Perhaps more strikingly, this was the highest annual growth rate observed in the past 15 years (Figure 1.1.1). While house price growth has breezed ahead, residential rents have grown at a slower rate, rising by 1.8 percent, on average, across countries over the same period.

Implications of a hot housing market for consumer prices

The house price surge comes at a time when questions are mounting over post-pandemic inflation dynamics (see Chapter 2). House prices matter for inflation because—through an asset pricing equation—they are linked to two measures of housing costs that could enter the CPI. One is the actual rent paid by tenants. The other is the imputed rent, or owner’s equivalent rent, which is an estimate of how much homeowners would need to pay were they to rent their own house. Overall, the rent component accounts, on average, for about 20 percent of the CPI.

How much of an increase in inflation is expected?

Continue reading here.

From new work by IMF Colleagues (Nina Biljanovska, Chenxu Fu, and Deniz Igan):

“Contrary to the expectation that house prices would decline during recessions (Igan and others 2011; Duca, Muellbauer, and Murphy, forthcoming), real house prices rose by 5.3 percent, on average, globally in 2020 as the pandemic-induced economic downturn took hold. Perhaps more strikingly, this was the highest annual growth rate observed in the past 15 years (Figure 1.1.1). While house price growth has breezed ahead,

Read the full article…

Posted by at 2:14 PM

Labels: Global Housing Watch

Euro Area Housing Markets: Trends, Challenges and Policy Responses

From a new paper by Vítor Martins, Alessandro Turrini, Bořek Vašíček, and Madalina Zamfir:

“The paper discusses the relevance of housing markets for macroeconomic developments from a euro area perspective, reviews trends in house prices and mortgage credit, and discusses policy approaches to prevent housing booms and deal with busts. After years of unsustainably strong house price growth in several Member States in a context of easing credit conditions, downward house price corrections took place after the 2008 financial crisis. A recovery in house prices started after 2013 under different conditions compared with the pre-financial crisis context. The house price recovery appeared to be driven to a greater extent by structural factors and to a lesser extent by buoyant household loans, as credit growth has been lagging behind house price growth in most countries. Prospects for house price growth after the COVID-19 outburst are clouded by uncertainty in light of the changing outlook when economic fundamentals and policy responses play in opposite directions. The current context is also different compared with the period before the global financial crisis because macro-prudential frameworks have been strengthened and macroprudential tools are increasingly used across the euro area. The effectiveness of policy tools needed to address risks linked to boom-bust dynamics in the real estate sector depends on their interaction, design and timely implementation. Policy composition and policy design also appear crucial in dealing with possible trade-offs among policy objectives, including between macro-financial stability and housing affordability.”

From a new paper by Vítor Martins, Alessandro Turrini, Bořek Vašíček, and Madalina Zamfir:

“The paper discusses the relevance of housing markets for macroeconomic developments from a euro area perspective, reviews trends in house prices and mortgage credit, and discusses policy approaches to prevent housing booms and deal with busts. After years of unsustainably strong house price growth in several Member States in a context of easing credit conditions, downward house price corrections took place after the 2008 financial crisis.

Read the full article…

Posted by at 7:20 AM

Labels: Global Housing Watch

Home Older Posts

Subscribe to: Posts