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Housing View – August 18, 2017

On cross-country:

On the US:

On other countries:

  • [Australia] Speech on Some Innovative Mortgage Data – Reserve Bank of Australia
  • [Australia] Monthly Property Update – CoreLogic
  • Assessing China’s Residential Real Estate Market – IMF
  • [China] Home Purchase Restriction and Housing Price: A Distribution Dynamics Analysis – Regional Science and Urban Economics
  • [Netherlands] Regional house price differences are widening: Dutch Housing Market Quarterly – Rabobank
  • [Spain] What has happened in Spain? The real estate bubble, corruption and housing development: A view from the local level – Geoforum
  • [United Kingdom] Residential Market Outlook – Cluttons
  • [United Kingdom] London mayor targets developers over affordable housing obligations – Financial Times

On cross-country:

On the US:

Read the full article…

Posted by at 5:00 AM

Labels: Housing

Inequality in China – Trends, Drivers, and Policy Remedies

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A new IMF reports finds that “China has grown rapidly and is on the brink of eradicating poverty. However, income inequality increased sharply from the early 1980s. While less equality is to be expected in the transition from central planning to a market-based economy, China is now among the most unequal countries in the world, despite a recent modest improvement.

Inequality has been driven by structural factors (especially demographics, the urban/rural divide and education/skills), with little offset from fiscal policies. These structural factors are likely to drive inequality higher.

This calls for more proactive use of fiscal policies to reduce inequality. On the revenue side: (1) increasing the progressivity of social security contributions and of personal and property taxes. On the spending side: (2) boosting social spending and promoting equal access across provinces and regardless of residency.”

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Continue reading here.

 

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A new IMF reports finds that “China has grown rapidly and is on the brink of eradicating poverty. However, income inequality increased sharply from the early 1980s. While less equality is to be expected in the transition from central planning to a market-based economy, China is now among the most unequal countries in the world, despite a recent modest improvement.

Inequality has been driven by structural factors (especially demographics,

Read the full article…

Posted by at 10:11 AM

Labels: Unemployment

Assessing China’s Residential Real Estate Market

A new IMF report on China says:

  • “China’s real estate market rebounded sharply after a temporary slowdown in 2014-2015. The tightening measures since late 2016 seem to have dampened market activity, but house prices and sales remain strong, particularly in smaller cities.”
  • “Risks are significant on the downside. If house prices rise further beyond “fundamental” levels and the bubble expands to smaller cities, it would increase the likelihood and costs of a sharp correction, which would weaken overall growth, undermine financial stability, reduce local government spending room, and spur capital outflows.”
  • “To stave off such risks, the increasing intensity of macro-prudential and city-specific policies is appropriate, given the diversity in housing conditions, and should continue to be deployed to ensure a smooth adjustment. The government should expand its toolkit to include additional macroprudential measures including more active use of debt servicing-to-income (DSTI) caps and capital requirements on banks’ exposure to the real estate sector.”
  • “A longer-term solution to manage better the frequent house price cycles is to introduce recurrent property taxes, resolve land supply constraints in large cities, mitigate local governments’ reliance on land sales, and accelerate reforms of the social security and “hukou” systems.”

 

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A new IMF report on China says:

  • “China’s real estate market rebounded sharply after a temporary slowdown in 2014-2015. The tightening measures since late 2016 seem to have dampened market activity, but house prices and sales remain strong, particularly in smaller cities.”
  • “Risks are significant on the downside. If house prices rise further beyond “fundamental” levels and the bubble expands to smaller cities, it would increase the likelihood and costs of a sharp correction,

Read the full article…

Posted by at 9:28 AM

Labels: Housing

Housing View – August 11, 2017

On cross-country:

On the US:

On other countries:

  • [Australia] Mapping the market shows a substantial decline in affordable housing supply in Sydney and Melbourne over the past five years – CoreLogic
  • [Canada] New mortgages continue to rise in Canada – CMHC
  • [United Kingdom] Housing is a growing political problem for the Conservatives – The Economist
  • [United Kingdom] How to solve Britain’s housing crisis – The Economist

On cross-country:

On the US:

On other countries:

  • [Australia] Mapping the market shows a substantial decline in affordable housing supply in Sydney and Melbourne over the past five years – CoreLogic
  • [Canada] New mortgages continue to rise in Canada – CMHC
  • [United Kingdom] Housing is a growing political problem for the Conservatives – The Economist
  • [United Kingdom] How to solve Britain’s housing crisis – The Economist

Read the full article…

Posted by at 5:00 AM

Labels: Housing

Stabilizing the System of Mortgage Finance in the United States

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A new IMF Working Paper by Richard Koss says that “It has been over a decade since the peak of house prices in the US was attained, and while there has been a concerted regulatory response to the subsequent collapse, the two Government Sponsored Enterprises (GSEs) remain in conservatorship. While this action served to forestall a deeper crisis at the time, over the past several years risks related to the system of mortgage finance can be seen building across several dimensions that need to be addressed. While reforms to the GSEs are an important part of dealing with these concerns, this paper argues that broader changes need to be made across the entire mortgage landscape to stabilize the system, even before the final state of the GSEs is fully determined.”

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Continue reading here.

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A new IMF Working Paper by Richard Koss says that “It has been over a decade since the peak of house prices in the US was attained, and while there has been a concerted regulatory response to the subsequent collapse, the two Government Sponsored Enterprises (GSEs) remain in conservatorship. While this action served to forestall a deeper crisis at the time, over the past several years risks related to the system of mortgage finance can be seen building across several dimensions that need to be addressed.

Read the full article…

Posted by at 4:12 PM

Labels: Housing

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