Global Housing Watch

Showing posts with label Global Housing Watch.   Show all posts

Housing View – March 27, 2020

On cross-country:

  • Measuring housing as a provider of well-being. What can the latest OECD figures tell us? – Housing Europe

 

On the US:

 

On other countries:  

  • [Australia] Australia housing auction activity dives due to coronavirus – Reuters
  • [Australia] Coronavirus restrictions tipped to send Australian house prices tumbling – Guardian
  • [China] A Quantitative Evaluation of the Housing Provident Fund Program in China – Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas
  • [Indonesia] Indonesia’s housing market is unremarkable – Global Property Guide
  • [Nigeria] How coronavirus will affect Nigeria’s real estate, house prices – The Guardian
  • [South Korea] Housing market in South Korea is slow-moving – Global Property Guide
  • [United Kingdom] The UK’s housing market still smooth – Global Property Guide
  • [United Kingdom] What will coronavirus do to house prices? – The Times
  • [United Kingdom] UK property demand plunges as virus takes hold – Financial Times

On cross-country:

  • Measuring housing as a provider of well-being. What can the latest OECD figures tell us? – Housing Europe

 

On the US:

  • Early Data Point to U.S. Housing Slowdown in Coming Weeks – Zillow
  • Understanding the Exposure at Default Risk of Commercial Real Estate Construction and Land Development Loans – Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas
  • Zillow Is Pausing Home Purchases.

Read the full article…

Posted by at 5:00 AM

Labels: Global Housing Watch

Housing View – March 20, 2020

On cross-country:

  • Where are the world’s most expensive cities? – The Economist

 

On the US:

  • America’s inequitable housing system is completely unprepared for coronavirus – Brookings
  • Information From Past Pandemics, And What We Can Learn: A Literature Review – Zillow
  • Buying a Home During a Pandemic – New York Times
  • Coronavirus, Oil Prices Send Shockwaves Through Houston Real Estate – Wall Street Journal
  • How Coronavirus Has Affected Real Estate – New York Times
  • ‘Golden Gates’ Review: Build It Here, Build It Now – Wall Street Journal
  • Home Value Growth Accelerated in February, Ending a 21-Month Slowdown (February 2020 Market Report) – Zillow
  • S housing market shows strength before coronavirus outbreak – Reuters
  • Federal ‘Fair Housing’ Policy Set for a Major Overhaul – Reason

 

On other countries:  

On cross-country:

  • Where are the world’s most expensive cities? – The Economist

 

On the US:

  • America’s inequitable housing system is completely unprepared for coronavirus – Brookings
  • Information From Past Pandemics, And What We Can Learn: A Literature Review – Zillow
  • Buying a Home During a Pandemic – New York Times
  • Coronavirus,

Read the full article…

Posted by at 5:00 AM

Labels: Global Housing Watch

Housing View – March 13, 2020

On cross-country:

  • Europe’s great house price boom continues, but sharp slowdown in North America, the Middle East and most of Asia-Pacific – Global Property Guide
  • World’s priciest homes: How Australian house prices compare to the rest of the world – RealEstate

 

On the US:

  • Urbanization and its Discontents – NBER
  • The housing affordability crisis is a reality: Lawmakers need to act, but responsibly – The Hill
  • Real Estate and the Wealth of a Nation – American Institute for Economic Research
  • Housing Finance At A Glance: A Monthly Chartbook, February 2020 – Urban Institute
  • However You Measure It, Parents of White College Graduates Are about 10 Times Wealthier Than Their Black Counterparts – Urban Institute
  • The Termination of LIBOR An Update on Implications for the Mortgage Market – Urban Institute
  • Institutional Investors Brought Higher Home Prices and Lower Vacancies to the Housing Recovery – Urban Institute
  • Five Facts about Our Housing Supply Explain High Rents and Home Prices – Urban Institute
  • Is housing a better investment than education? – Quartz
  • Plunging Mortgage Rates Might Not End U.S. Housing Doldrums – Wall Street Journal
  • Coronavirus Looms Over Crucial Spring Season for Housing Market – Wall Street Journal

 

On other countries:

On cross-country:

  • Europe’s great house price boom continues, but sharp slowdown in North America, the Middle East and most of Asia-Pacific – Global Property Guide
  • World’s priciest homes: How Australian house prices compare to the rest of the world – RealEstate

 

On the US:

  • Urbanization and its Discontents – NBER
  • The housing affordability crisis is a reality: Lawmakers need to act,

Read the full article…

Posted by at 5:00 AM

Labels: Global Housing Watch

Housing View – March 6, 2020

On cross-country:

 

On the US:

  • The Great Wall Street Housing Grab – New York Times
  • How the Democratic Candidates Would Tackle the Housing Crisis – New York Times
  • How Bloomberg, Sanders and Warren Responded to a Survey on Housing – New York Times
  • Evidence Shows Military Service Reduces the Racial Homeownership Gap – Urban Institute
  • Why Do Black College Graduates Have a Lower Homeownership Rate Than White People Who Dropped Out of High School? – Urban Institute
  • Reverse Mortgage Use Differs by Race and Ethnicity. Here’s Why It Matters – Urban Institute
  • Is the Sudden Increase in Black Homeownership Too Good to Be True? – Urban Institute
  • Breaking Down the Black-White Homeownership Gap – Urban Institute
  • Vacant “Zombie” Foreclosures Increase to 3.1 Percent Nationwide – ATTOM
  • For Those Living in Public Housing, It’s a Long Way to Work – Citylab
  • Housing Discrimination and Pollution Exposures in the United States – NBER
  • Does Information About Climate Risk Affect Property Values? – NBER
  • Vote Warren for a Pro-Housing President – Harvard Political Review
  • Digging Deeper into the Story: The Widespread Implications of the Growth in High Income Renters on Low- and Middle-Income Renter Households – Harvard Joint Center for Housing Studies

 

On other countries:

On cross-country:

 

On the US:

  • The Great Wall Street Housing Grab – New York Times
  • How the Democratic Candidates Would Tackle the Housing Crisis – New York Times
  • How Bloomberg, Sanders and Warren Responded to a Survey on Housing – New York Times
  • Evidence Shows Military Service Reduces the Racial Homeownership Gap – Urban Institute
  • Why Do Black College Graduates Have a Lower Homeownership Rate Than White People Who Dropped Out of High School?

Read the full article…

Posted by at 5:00 AM

Labels: Global Housing Watch

House Prices in Australia

From the IMF’s latest report on Australia:

“The fast increase in housing prices since mid-2019 has partly undone earlier price declines. As such, despite lower mortgage rates, there has only been a limited improvement in housing affordability for many households since the peak in housing prices in 2017.

Staff’s Views

Housing supply reforms are critical for restoring affordability. More efficient long-term planning, zoning, and local government reforms that promote housing supply growth, along with a focus on infrastructure development, remain critical to meet the needs of a growing urban population. Initiatives such as “City and Regional Deals” that aim to integrate transport, housing and land use polices to create the opportunity for coordinated action to maximize the value of infrastructure investment, should help meet growing demand for housing.

Broader tax reforms could reinforce the effectiveness of supply-side measures. Transitioning from a housing transfer stamp duty to a general land tax would improve efficiency by easing entry into the housing market and promoting labor mobility, while providing a more stable revenue source for the states. Such reforms could be complemented by reducing structural incentives for leveraged investment by households, including limiting negative gearing in residential real estate. Nonetheless, major changes affecting investment decisions and underlying demand for housing should be gradual, and such reforms should not be undertaken in isolation. In addition, housing policy measures discriminating against nonresidential buyers, such as state-level foreign purchaser duty surcharges on residential property, should be replaced by alternative, non-discriminatory measures, such as a general surcharge on vacant property or surcharges on all investor-owned housing transactions.

Authorities’ Views

The authorities saw potential risks linked to a possible reemergence of rapid housing price growth. With population growth projected to remain strong, the ongoing weakness in building approvals following the past decline in housing prices and tighter credit supply for developers could result in a shortage of new housing and renewed rapid housing price growth, with the risk that this would, in turn, lead to stronger growth in household debt.

The authorities stressed that they would continue to facilitate housing supply reforms and other measures to improve housing affordability. They highlighted that the Commonwealth government provides annual housing-related funding such as rental subsidy for individuals through the Commonwealth Rent Assistance (CRA), funding to states and territories to improve Australians’ access to affordable housing through the National Housing and Homelessness Agreement (NHHA), and the First Home Loan Deposit Scheme to provide loan guarantee to lenders for first-time home buyers. Housing has also been a priority in the City and Regional Deals. The authorities thought that tax policy was not the right tool to address potential speculative behavior in housing markets, as negative gearing applies across investments and investments in residential housing are relatively highly taxed, and that macroprudential policy should instead be employed as needed.”

 

From the IMF’s latest report on Australia:

“The fast increase in housing prices since mid-2019 has partly undone earlier price declines. As such, despite lower mortgage rates, there has only been a limited improvement in housing affordability for many households since the peak in housing prices in 2017.

Staff’s Views

Housing supply reforms are critical for restoring affordability. More efficient long-term planning, zoning, and local government reforms that promote housing supply growth,

Read the full article…

Posted by at 5:39 PM

Labels: Global Housing Watch

Home Older Posts

Subscribe to: Posts