Inclusive Growth

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2018 AEA Annual Meeting’s Papers on Inequality

On income inequality

  • Top Income Inequality in the 21st Century: Some Cautionary Notes – AEA
  • Capitalists in the Twenty-first Century – Paper
  • Long Run Developments of Income and Wealth Inequality: Do They Move Together? – AEA
  • Has Middle Class Wealth Recovered? – Paper
  • Income and Wealth Inequality in America, 1949-2013 – Paper
  • Recent Trends in the Variability of Men’s Earnings: Evidence From Administrative and Survey Data – Paper
  • Taxes, Regulations of Businesses and Evolution of Income Inequality in the United States – Paper
  • Origins of Wealth Inequality – AEA
  • An Empirical Institutionalist Analysis of the Determinants of Income and Wealth Inequality in USA Since the 1980s – Paper
  • Road to Despair and the Geography of the America Left Behind – AEA

 

On gender inequality

  • Top Income Inequality and the Gender Pay Gap – Paper and Presentation
  • Choosing Between Career and Family – Gender Roles as a Coordination Device in a Specialization Game – AEA
  • Gender Inequality in Post-capitalism: Theorizing Institutions for Democratic Workplaces – Paper

 

On racial inequality

  • Examining the Black-White Earnings Differential with Administrative Records – Paper
  • Occupational Licensing Reduces Racial and Gender Wage Gaps: Evidence From the Survey of Income and Program Participation – AEA
  • Higher Education in Orthodox, Heterodox, and Stratification Economics Perspectives on Racial Economic Inequality – AEA
  • Poverty and Inequality – AEA
  • Inequality Between and Within Immigrant Groups in the United States – Paper
  • Revising The Racial Wage Gap Among Men: The Role Of Non-employment And Incarceration – AEA
  • Revisiting Bergmann’s Occupational Crowding Model – AEA
  • Racial Differences in Labor Force Participation Since the Great Recession: What’s Happening? – Paper
  • The Color of Wealth: Evidence Across United States Cities – AEA
  • No End in Sight? The Widening Racial Wealth Gap Since The Great Recession – AEA

 

On populism and globalization

  • Understanding the Rise of Populism: Financialisation, Household Balance Sheet Structures, and Inequality in the United States Since 1980s – Paper
  • Trade and Inequality: Evidence From Worker-level Adjustment in France – AEA
  • Trade, Jobs, and Inequality – AEA
  • Globalization and Inequality in Innovation: A Perspective from U.S. R&D Tax Credit Policy – Paper
  • Making Financial Globalization More Inclusive – Paper and Presentation
  • Making Globalization More Inclusive: When Compensation Is Not Enough – Paper

 

On labor

  • Earnings Inequality and Mobility Trends in the United States: Nationally Representative Estimates from Longitudinally Linked Employer-employee Data – Paper and Presentation
  • Theories of Redistribution and Share of Labor Income – Paper
  • Labor Unions and Wealth Inequality – AEA
  • The Care Penalty and the Power Premium: Earnings Inequality in the United States – AEA
  • Inequality, Good Governance and Endemic Corruption – Paper
  • Inequality and the Disappearing Large Firm Pay Premium – Paper
  • Earnings Inequality and the Minimum Wage: Evidence From Brazil – Paper
  • Unequal Growth in Local Wages: Rail Versus Internet Infrastructure – Paper
  • Determinants of the Wage Share: Evidence From Firm-level Data – Presentation
  • Declining Labor and Capital Shares – Paper
  • Labor Share and Technology Dynamics – Paper
  • Theories of Redistribution and Share of Labor Income – Paper
  • Earnings Inequality and the Role of the Firm – Paper and Presentation
  • Inequality in Retirement Wealth – Paper and Presentation
  • Delayed Retirement and the Growth in Economic Inequality by Work Ability – Paper
  • Robots, Growth and Inequality: Should We Fear the Robot Revolution? – Paper and Presentation
  • Endogenous Skill Choice as Source of Productivity Dispersion – Presentation
  • The Fall of the Labor Share and the Rise of Superstar Firms – Paper

 

On Africa

  • Inclusive Finance for SMEs in South Africa and Its Impact on Growth and Inequality – Paper
  • Institutions, Structures and Policy Paradigms: Toward Understanding Inequality in Africa – AEA

 

On other issues

  • Extreme Inequality: Evidence From Brazil, India, the Middle-East, and South Africa – Paper and Presentation
  • When Inequality Matters for Macro and Macro Matters for Inequality – Paper
  • Estimating Unequal Gains Across United States Consumers With Supplier Trade Data – Paper and Presentation
  • Why Does Portfolio Choice Correlate Across Generations? – Paper
  • Ten Years after the Crisis: A Lost Decade? – Paper
  • Military Expenditures And Income Inequality, Evidence From A Panel Of Transition Countries (1990-2015) – AEA
  • Tax Rates and Progressivity: Was the System More Progressive when the Top Rate was 91 Percent? – Paper and Presentation
  • Rising Inequality, Household Debt, And The Slow Recovery After Great Recession – AEA
  • Consumption Inequality and The Frequency of Purchases – Paper
  • Mergers and Acquisitions, Technological Change and Inequality – Paper
  • Same Storm, Different Disasters: Consumer Credit Access, Income Inequality, and Natural Disaster Recovery – Paper
  • Rethinking Inequality in 21st Century – Financial Sector, Household Balance Sheet Structures and Distribution in the United States Since 1980s – Paper
  • The Effects of Technical Change: Does Capital Aggregation Matter? – AEA

On income inequality

  • Top Income Inequality in the 21st Century: Some Cautionary Notes – AEA
  • Capitalists in the Twenty-first Century – Paper
  • Long Run Developments of Income and Wealth Inequality: Do They Move Together? – AEA
  • Has Middle Class Wealth Recovered? – Paper
  • Income and Wealth Inequality in America, 1949-2013 – Paper
  • Recent Trends in the Variability of Men’s Earnings: Evidence From Administrative and Survey Data – Paper
  • Taxes,

Read the full article…

Posted by at 1:33 PM

Labels: Unemployment

10 top thinkers on Development, summarized in 700 words by Stefan Dercon

From a blog by Duncan Green: “Stefan gave us a tour of the ‘Big Ideals, Big Egos and Big Thinkers in development’. Here they are, points for recognizing them.” Continue reading the wonderful summary here.

From a blog by Duncan Green: “Stefan gave us a tour of the ‘Big Ideals, Big Egos and Big Thinkers in development’. Here they are, points for recognizing them.” Continue reading the wonderful summary here.

Read the full article…

Posted by at 10:24 AM

Labels: Macro Demystified, Unemployment

Workshop: Trade Policy, Inclusion and the Rise of the Service Economy

The Council on Economic Policies, the International Monetary Fund and the World Trade Organization are organizing a workshop on 25-26 April, 2018 in Geneva, Switzerland, on policy relevant aspects of the links between trade in services and inclusive growth. Papers presented in the workshop will be considered for an expedited review process for a Review of International Economics special issue to be published in 2019.

Topics

We particularly encourage the submission of unpublished empirical work that uses new datasets or exploits policy experiments in a novel and informative way. Topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

  • What is the effect of services trade on inclusive growth and structural transformation? Is trade in services a promising development strategy for developing economies?
  • How does services trade affect employment, income and gender inequality, quality of and access to service delivery, and innovation?
  • What are key determinants of and barriers to services trade? To what extent have trade agreements reduced them?
  • What policies are needed to increase services trade opportunities for inclusive growth?

Program

The workshop will start with a welcome dinner on April 24. April 25 will be devoted to paper presentations as well as a policy debate with trade negotiators and other practitioners in the evening. Presentations will continue in the morning of April 26, followed by an exploration of new directions for research in the afternoon. The workshop will take place at the WTO Secretariat.

Submissions

Papers should be submitted by February 15, 2018 to trade@cepweb.org. Successful submissions will be notified by beginning of March 2018.

Program Committee

  • Peter Egger, ETH Zurich
  • Ricardo Hausmann, Harvard University
  • Bernard Hoekman, European University Institute
  • Bob Koopman, World Trade Organization
  • Aaditya Mattoo, World Bank
  • Margaret McMillan, Tufts University
  • Chris Papageorgiou, International Monetary Fund
  • Johannes Schwarzer, Council on Economic Policies

The Council on Economic Policies, the International Monetary Fund and the World Trade Organization are organizing a workshop on 25-26 April, 2018 in Geneva, Switzerland, on policy relevant aspects of the links between trade in services and inclusive growth. Papers presented in the workshop will be considered for an expedited review process for a Review of International Economics special issue to be published in 2019.

Topics

We particularly encourage the submission of unpublished empirical work that uses new datasets or exploits policy experiments in a novel and informative way.

Read the full article…

Posted by at 11:04 PM

Labels: Unemployment

Growth-Equity Trade-offs in Structural Reforms

From a new IMF working paper by Jonathan Ostry, Andrew Berg, and Siddharth Kothari:

“Do structural reforms that aim to boost potential output also change the distribution of income? We shed light on this question by looking at the broad patterns in the cross-country data covering advanced, emerging-market, and low-income countries. Our main finding is that there is indeed evidence of a growth-equity tradeoff for some important reforms. Financial and capital account liberalization seem to increase both growth and inequality, as do some measures of liberalization of current account transactions. Reforms aimed at strengthening the impartiality of and adherence to the legal system seem to entail no growth-equity tradeoff—such reforms are good for growth and do not worsen inequality. The results for our index of network reforms as well as our measure of the decentralization of collective labor bargaining are the weakest and least robust, potentially due to data limitations. We also ask: If some structural reforms worsen inequality, to what degree does this offset the growth gains from the reforms themselves? While higher inequality does dampen the growth benefits, the net effect on growth remains positive for most reform indicators.”

Snip20180106_1

From a new IMF working paper by Jonathan Ostry, Andrew Berg, and Siddharth Kothari:

“Do structural reforms that aim to boost potential output also change the distribution of income? We shed light on this question by looking at the broad patterns in the cross-country data covering advanced, emerging-market, and low-income countries. Our main finding is that there is indeed evidence of a growth-equity tradeoff for some important reforms. Financial and capital account liberalization seem to increase both growth and inequality,

Read the full article…

Posted by at 8:28 AM

Labels: Unemployment

Okun’s Law in Russia

A new paper concludes that “Okun’s law is applicable in Russia.” “The economic connection between economic growth rates and changes in unemployment proposed by Okun (1962) over half a century ago remains one of the main tools for analyzing labor markets.”

“Gabrisch and Buscher (2006) proposed that the formation of the labor market mechanism in the formerly planned economies could be considered as completed once Okun’s law became persistently applicable there.”

“The general conclusion is that Okun’s law is applicable in Russia both in the short and long run. A comparison (Akhundova et al., 2005) has shown that transition processes in the Russian labor market were completed during the first half of the 2000s (i.e., the shaping of the labor market mechanisms took slightly more than 10 years).”

The article is available from the Russian Journal of Economics.

A new paper concludes that “Okun’s law is applicable in Russia.” “The economic connection between economic growth rates and changes in unemployment proposed by Okun (1962) over half a century ago remains one of the main tools for analyzing labor markets.”

“Gabrisch and Buscher (2006) proposed that the formation of the labor market mechanism in the formerly planned economies could be considered as completed once Okun’s law became persistently applicable there.”

“The general conclusion is that Okun’s law is applicable in Russia both in the short and long run.

Read the full article…

Posted by at 10:42 AM

Labels: Unemployment

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