Showing posts with label Profiles of Economists.   Show all posts

Christopher Pissarides: “I knew the route to happiness was a good job”

From LSE Business Review:

“Q: What’s your personal interest in the Future of Work?

From my late teens – well before ‘good work’ became the fashionable concept that it is today – I knew the route to happiness was a good job. Work is where most of us spend most of our waking time and it is at the heart of family life. It’s also the driving force behind our local and national economies. Work connects the experiences and living standards of individuals to the economic and social health of the country. Knowing this has driven my own working life. I’ve researched employment, unemployment and job creation for over 40 years now, concentrating on the social and economic conditions needed to create good and long-lasting work.’

Continue reading here. Also see my profile of Christopher Pissarides here.

 

From LSE Business Review:

“Q: What’s your personal interest in the Future of Work?

From my late teens – well before ‘good work’ became the fashionable concept that it is today – I knew the route to happiness was a good job. Work is where most of us spend most of our waking time and it is at the heart of family life. It’s also the driving force behind our local and national economies.

Read the full article…

Posted by at 9:39 AM

Labels: Profiles of Economists

Thaler on the Evolution of Behavioral Economics

From a new post by Timothy Taylor:

“Richard Thaler won the Nobel Prize in economics in 2017  “for his contributions to behavioural economics.  He tells the story of how the field evolved from early musings through small-scale tests and more comprehensive theories and all the way to public policy in his Nobel prize lecture, “From Cashews to Nudges: The Evolution of Behavioral Economics.” It is ungated and freely available in the June 2018 issue of the American Economic Review (108:6, pp. 1265–1287).”

Continue reading here.

(Picture from University of Chicago web page.)

From a new post by Timothy Taylor:

“Richard Thaler won the Nobel Prize in economics in 2017  “for his contributions to behavioural economics.  He tells the story of how the field evolved from early musings through small-scale tests and more comprehensive theories and all the way to public policy in his Nobel prize lecture, “From Cashews to Nudges: The Evolution of Behavioral Economics.” It is ungated and freely available in the June 2018 issue of the American Economic Review (108:6,

Read the full article…

Posted by at 9:43 AM

Labels: Profiles of Economists

Lawrence R. Klein and the making of large-scale macro-econometric modeling, 1938-1955

From new Documentos CEDE by Erich Pinzón-Fuchs:

“Lawrence R. Klein was the father of macro-econometric modeling, the scientific practice that dominated macroeconomics throughout the second half of the twentieth century. Therefore, understanding how Klein developed his identity as a macro-econometrician and how he conceived and forged macro-econometric modeling at the same time, is essential to draw a clear picture of the origins and subsequent development of this scientific practice in the United States. To this aim, I focus on Klein’s early trajectory as a student of economics and as an economist (from 1938-1955), and I particularly examine the extent to which the people and institutions Klein encountered helped him shape his professional identity. Klein’s experience at places like Berkeley, MIT, Cowles, and the University of Michigan, as well as his early acquaintance with people such as Griffith Evans, Paul Samuelson, and Trygve Haavelmo were decisive in the formation of his idea on how econometrics, expert knowledge, mathematical rigor, and a specific institutional configuration should enter macro-econometric modeling. Although Klein’s identity defined some of the most important characteristics of this practice, by the end of the 1950s, macro-econometric modeling became a scientific practice independent of Klein’s enthusiasm and with a “life of its own,” ready to be further developed and adapted to specific contexts by the community of macroeconomists.”Picture from Nobelprize.org.

From new Documentos CEDE by Erich Pinzón-Fuchs:

“Lawrence R. Klein was the father of macro-econometric modeling, the scientific practice that dominated macroeconomics throughout the second half of the twentieth century. Therefore, understanding how Klein developed his identity as a macro-econometrician and how he conceived and forged macro-econometric modeling at the same time, is essential to draw a clear picture of the origins and subsequent development of this scientific practice in the United States.

Read the full article…

Posted by at 10:50 AM

Labels: Forecasting Forum, Profiles of Economists

21st-century Indian economists

For a list of 21st-century Indian economists, click here.

For a list of 21st-century Indian economists, click here.

Read the full article…

Posted by at 1:09 PM

Labels: Profiles of Economists

20th-century Indian economists

For a list of 20th-century Indian economists, click here.

For a list of 20th-century Indian economists, click here.

Read the full article…

Posted by at 10:27 AM

Labels: Profiles of Economists

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